Are there additional documents and other requirements in a chapter 13 case? What is required in the chapter 13 plan?

If you are filing a chapter 13 case, rather than a chapter 7, in addition to the documents mentioned above, you must file a plan that describes how much you will pay your creditors and over what time period. Your plan must provide that you pay creditors at least what they could have received in chapter 7 liquidation case, which basically means creditors must receive payments equal to the value of your non-exempt assets.

In addition, the plan must provide that you contribute all your “disposable income” to the plan. Disposable income is the income above what is necessary for the support of you and your family. However, in many cases the means test formula determines that amount. The means test is a very complicated test, but essentially requires that you average your income over the past six months (from any source including regular gifts from family members), then deduct a series of allowed expenses, and see what is left to pay creditors. You will most likely need an attorney to complete this analysis.

The chapter 13 plan lasts either until you pay your debts in full or until the end of a three- to five-year period. For certain low income debtors the maximum plan period without court approval is three years. For other debtors, creditors may be able to insist that the debtor pay a five-year plan.

Within 30 days of filing your petition, you must begin making payments under your plan. You make the payments to a trustee, who distributes the payments to the creditors.

Like in a chapter 7 case, after filing the bankruptcy petition, you must attend a creditors’ meeting (also known as a 341 meeting, named after the section of the bankruptcy law that requires the meeting). The chapter 13 trustee will conduct the meeting and will question you under oath about the paperwork you filed in your case. This creditors’ meeting will last longer than a meeting in a chapter 7 case. The trustee will likely question you about your income and your expenses, and may also require additional documentation at the meeting.

After the meeting of creditors, you, the chapter 13 trustee, and those creditors who wish to attend will come to court for a hearing on your chapter 13 plan. If there are no problems, the court will approve (“confirm”) your plan.

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